Kælder

I The Treasury

In the last section of the Treasury many of Rosenborg’s main attractions are on display, especially the Crown Jewels, the Crown Regalia, the Crown of the Absolutist Kings and the Queens’ Crown.

The collection of Crown Jewels for use by the reigning Queen was established with the will of Queen Sophie Magdalene in 1746 and subsequently enlarged through gifts from later queens and princesses. For the last coronation of the absolute monarchy in 1840, Queen Caroline Amalie had the main part of the Crown Jewels put together in four sets consisting of, for example, tiara, necklace, brooch and earrings.

The Crown Regalia in section 3 includes Sceptre, Orb, Anointing Rapier and Ampulla, all made in gold and jewels. Originally there were more Danish regalia, but some were sold by Christian II in 1523 and others by Christian IV in the 1620’s. The most important Regalia is the Crown of the Absolutist Kings. Unlike Christian IV’s old-fashioned open crown, this crown is closed. The large sapphire in front can be traced back to Frederik I.

Objects in this room
5394-5412
5394. – 5396. Two gold boxes with inlaid medallions, made by H.J. Schrader in 1753. On the outside, relief of Queen Louise on blue enamel, made after M.G. Arbien’s coronation medal from 1746. Inside enamelled landscape. The boxes made by court jeweller Christopher Fabritius?
5398. Heart-shaped vinaigrette of gold with Frederik V’s monogram.
5400. Watch in locket of gold with enamelled flowers. From c. 1760.
5402. Vinaigrette of enamelled gold representing a shepherdess with a dog. Made by Nathaniel Falchengreen in Copenhagen, 1757.
5404. Gold box; in the lid, a relief in mother-of-pearl with portraits of the first twelve kings of the House of Oldenborg. Made after M.G. Arbiens medal commemorating the 300 years jubilee of the Royal House, 1749.
5406. Gold clock; on the dial relief portaits of the first twelve kings of the House of Oldenborg. Made in Copenhagen by the watchmaker Pierre Charlo in the mid-18th century.
5408. Sundial of partly gilt and enamelled silver, containing a spirit level, compass, perpetual calender and inscriptions by A. Holm. Present to Frederik V on the occasion of the 300 years jubilee of the Royal House in 1749?
5410. The Eider Cup of gold, made by Nicolai Langermann, 1751. Mounted plates with inscriptions and reliefs commemorating the Treaty of Frederiksborg in 1720 and the coronation of Queen Anna Sophie in 1721. The plates were made by Peter Klein and originate from a book binding, a 50th birthday present to Frederik IV from Anna Sophie Reventlow in 1721.
5412. Cup of Allegiance of gold, made by Nicolai Langermann in 1756. Mounted plates with inscriptions and reliefs commemorating Frederik IV’s 50th birthday and the Pledge of Allegiance by the Schleswig Assembly in 1721. The plates were made by Peter Klein and originate from a book binding, a 50th birthday present to Frederik IV from Anna Sophie Reventlow in 1721.
5414-5438
5414. Covered cup of gold with inlaid medals of Frederik IV, Prince Jørgen and Queen Louise. Copenhagen, c. 1750.
5416. Agate box mounted with chased gold and studded with brilliants. France, c. 1740?
5418. The Insignia of the Order of the Elephant, set with diamonds, rubies and sapphires, and Frederik V’s monogram. Made for Prince Frederik, the Heir Presumptive, by J.F. Fistaine, 1772?
5420. Octagonal Bohemian topaz with intaglio portrait of Frederik V, carved by Lorenz Natter in 1757. Signed.
5426. Box of jasper and gold with rubies and brilliants; curved triangular shape. Made in Copenhagen by the French jeweller J.F. Fistaine in 1761.
5428. Tureen of blue-enamelled and gilt silver, ornamented with biscuitware reliefs after antique cameos. Made in Copenhagen, c. 1755, by Nicolai Langemann.
5430. Tureen of blue-enamelled and gilt silver (as no. 5428) with portraits in relief of Queen Juliane Marie’s relatives in Brunswick, made by J.E. Bauert in 1755. The two tureens belonged to Queen Juliane Marie and were inspired by nos. 4374, 4465 and 4654.
5432. Oval gold box. In the lid, relief of Frederik V carved in Icelandic agate. Copenhagen, c. 1766.
5434. Gold box with miniature of Queen Juliane Marie surrounded with diamonds, painted by W.A. Müller c. 1780.
5436. Gold coffee and tea service, made by Th.A. Westrup in Copenhagen 1761-62 for the Lord High Steward, Count Adam Gottlob Moltke, friend of Frederik IV. (No. 5438 also belongs to this).
5438. Twelve teaspoons and sugar tongs of gold from the mid-18th century. (Belongs to no. 5436).
5440-5454
5440. Necklace of river pearls with clasp of brilliants. According to tradition, this was presented to Queen Caroline Mathilde by Scottish women at her departure for Denmark in 1766. Inherited in the Ducal family of Augustenborg.
5442. A pair of earrings in rock crystal with yellow topaz pendants. Belonged to Caroline Mathilde.
5444. Watch in pierced locket, with wreath and crown of rubies and diamonds, believed to be a present from Caroline Mathilde.
5446. Brooch, originally a ring, with Cape ruby and diamonds in a gold setting. Belonged to Count Marcus Gerhard Rosencrone.
Mementos from Christian VII’s foreign travels in 1768-69:
5448. Christian VII, relief portrait in diamonds, presented to the King by the goldsmiths of Paris, 1768.
5450. Box of gold for the King’s diploma of the Freedom of the City of London. Made by John Harvey. Allegorical reliefs on the lid signed: G.M. Moser fecit 1769.
5452. Seal from the King’s diploma as Honorary Doctor of Oxford University.
5454. Box of gold for the King’s diploma as Honorary Member of the Goldsmiths’ Guild in London. Made by James Hunt in London.
5456-5480
5456. Enamelled gold box with “Capitoline doves” in mosaic. Belonged to Catharina II of Russia. Made by David Rudolph, Skt. Petersburg.
5458. “Souvenir case” of enamelled metal with gold mounting. Inside pen and strips of ivory with inscription by Prince Frederik, the Heir Presumptive. Denmark, c. 1780.
5460. Chatelaine of gold with enamel miniatures, from c. 1770.
5462. “Souvenir case” of gold with green enamel, made by Frederik (II) Fabritius c. 1780, with miniature portraits of Prince Frederik, the Heir Presumptive and his consort, painted by Cornelius Høyer.
5464. “Souvenir case” of metal with gold mounting and miniature portraits of Juliane Marie and Prince Frederik, the Heir Presumptive. From c. 1780.
5466. “Souvenir case” of ivory with gold mounting and miniatures of Count Adam Ferdinand Moltke and the Moltke arms, painted by Cornelius Høyer c. 1785. The case made in France, 1775-76.
5468. Queen Caroline Mathilde’s watch, a present to the Queen from her mother-in-law, Juliane Marie. The clock case and chatelaine studded with diamonds. Made by J.F. Fistaine in Copenhagen, 1767. The works are signed: Jodin à Paris.
5470. Frederik V’s collection of minerals: 86 different precious stones, semi-precious stones, minerals and artificial stones, set in individual rings, of which 25 carry the name of the stone in black letters on white enamel ground. The collection reflects the interest in the natural sciences shown during the Age of Enlightenment.
5472. Christian VII’s gold rapier made by the court swordmaker, N.C. Plockross in 1766. Worn by Frederik VI at the Congress of Vienna, 1815.
5474. Cane walking stick with engraved gold knob and enamelled inscription: Quoiqu’ absent toujours present: The absent one is always present. A present from Queen Marie Sophie Frederikke to Frederik VI during his participation at the Congress of Vienna.
5476. Diamond-studded rapier, a birthday present from Caroline Mathilde to Christian VII in 1769. Made by Frederik (II) Fabritius.
5478. Cane walking stick with enamelled gold knob, engraved S. May have belonged to J.F. Struensee.
5480. Rapier with gold hilt, made by Frederik (II) Fabritius, probably for Prince Frederik, the Heir Presumptive (VI) in the 1780’s. Worn by Christian VIII.
5484-5508
5484. Medallion of gold and pearls with locks of Frederik VI’s and his Queen’s hair. Belonged to their daughter, Princess Caroline.
5486. Pendant of gold filigree with a lock of Frederik VI’s hair and his portrait carved out of a conch-shell. Belonged to his daughter, Duchess Vilhelmine.
5488. Bracelet of gold with various semi-precious stones (The Vesuvius Stones). Sent home from Italy in 1828 by Frederik VII to his fiancée, Princess Vilhelmine.
5490. Gold medal with Frederik VI’s portrait in profile, struck on the occasion of the King’s death, 3.12.1839. Signed: C. Christensen.
5498. Bracelet of gold with inlaid medal of Christian VIII and Caroline Mathilde, struck on the occasion of the anointing, 28.6.1840. Bracelet made by court jeweller Emil Ferdinand Dahl. Medal signed: C. Christensen. Belonged to Caroline Amalie.
5500. Gold medal with Christian VIII’s portrait in profile, struck on the occasion of his accession, 3.12.1839. Signed: F. Krohn.
5501. Gold snuffbox with enamel and brilliants. Given as a gift at Christian VIII’s anointing in 1840? Made by C.M. Weisshaupt?
5502. Caroline Amalie, miniature portrait, in crowned, diamond studded frame, to be worn as a decoration. Painted by N.C. Hansen after the painting by H.C. Jensen, and presented to Dorothea Rosen, Lady-in-Waiting, in 1869.
5504. Cylindrical watch in gold locket with portrait of Christian VIII, enamelled. Locket Box marked: G. Loup.
5506. Cylindrical watch of gold with portrait of princess Mariane, enameled. Locket marked: G. Loup. Works Elffroth & Co.
5508. Frederik VII’s monogram in diamonds, presented by the King in 1851 to Madame Cathrine Christiansen in Flensborg for her services in tending the wounded in the war of 1848-50.
5510-5526
5510. Gold box. On the lid a double crowned FA, signifying Prince Frederik August of Nør. Made in Copenhagen in 1851 by F.W. Knoblich.
5512. Snake brooch of enamelled gold with precious stones and pendant watch. Belonged to Countess Danner.
5514. Snuffbox of gold with enamel, brilliants and Frederik VII’s portrait in profile. Signed E. Young. Made at Frederiksborg Castle on 26.10.1855.
5516. Gold ring with Frederik VII’s crowned monogram in diamonds on blue enamel with a wreath of brilliants. Made by Peter Hertz. Presented by Frederik VII on his deathbed on 15.11.1863 to the Steward of Glücksborg Castle.
5517. Gold ring with a crowned heart and Frederik VII’s monogram in diamonds. A present for Countess Danner?
5518. Handle of a riding whip, of coral and gold, made by the court jeweller J. Diderichsen, 1859.
5519. Serpent-brooch of enamelled gold with opals and diamonds. Fredrik VII’s motto, “The People’s Love is my Strenght”, is inscribed on the back of the serpent in red and white, the colours of the Danish flag. Gift to Countess Danner?
5520. The Tunisian Order of Nishan ed-Dem, with diamonds, presented to Frederik VII in 1861.
5522. Skater in gold and Baroque pearl, made by the court jeweller J. Diderichsen in 1862 for Frederik VII, who died, however, before he received it.
5524. Jewellery set of gold with citrines, amthysts, pearls and diamonds. Belonged to Countess Danner, possibly a birthday present from Frederik VII, 1860. Made by court jeweller J. Diderichsen.
5526. Opera glasses with mother-of-pearl and enamelled gold mounting depicting Countess Danner’s crowned monogram and coat-of-arms, and miniatures of the Palaces of Frederiksborg and Fredensborg. A present from Carl XV as a memento of his visit to Denmark in 1862. Supplied by Benjamin Leja in Stockholm. Made in France?
5528-5532
Collection of crown jewels for the use of the reigning Queen, founded by Queen Sophie Magdalene in her Will of 1746, and subsequently added to by gifts from later queens and princesses. At the last Absolutist anointing in 1840, Queen Caroline Amalie had the main part of the crown jewels re-made into four sets:
5528. Set of emeralds and brilliants with diadem, necklace, brooch and earrings. Made in 1840 by C.M. Weisshaupt. The emeralds were originally a present from Christian VI to Sophie Magdalene at Frederik V’s birth in 1723.
5530. Costume jewellery: eleven hearts of silver with rubies. From the 17th century.
5532. Set of pearls, rubies and diamonds with necklace, brooch and earrings. Made in 1840 by C.M. Weisshaupt. The pearl necklace belonged to Christian V’s consort, Charlotte Amalie; the clasp and the two ruby-studded extra links date from 1840.
5534-5542
5534. The Sceptre, of gold with enamel and table-cut diamonds. Made for the coronation of Frederik III in 1648 by an unknown goldsmith in Copenhagen. Used at anointings during the period of Absolutism from Christian V in 1671 to Christian VIII in 1840.
5536. The Orb, of gold with enamel and table-cut diamonds. Made for Frederik III’s coronation in 1648 in Hamburg. Used at anointings during the period of Absolutism.
5538. The Ampulla of gold with enamel and table-cut diamonds. Made for the coronation of Frederik III in 1648 by an unknown goldsmith in Copenhagen. Used at anointings during the period of Absolutism.
5540. The Anointing Rapier, of gold with enamel, table-cut and rose-cut stones. Used by the Absolutist kings and possibly by Frederik III. Originally a wedding present from Christian IV to Frederik III in 1643. Hilt of the rapier and chape of the scabbard made by the goldsmith Lucas Schaller in Hamburg. The enamelled coats-of-arms of the provinces were made for Christian V’s anointing in 1671.
5542. Amethyst (1305 carats / 261 g.) in a casing with Christian V’s name in gold on enamle, possibly made by Paul Kurtz, 1671. The jewel was only used when the kings sat on the throne (no. 2137), during the coronation, being otherwise replaced by an imitation. The Amethyst was used as a decoration on Frederik III’s riding trappings during the coronation in 1648.
5544-5558
5544. The Star of the Order of the Elephant in gold and silver embroidery with pearls and table-cut stones. Made for Christian V’s anointing robes in 1671.
5546. The Chain of the Order of the Elephant with Insignia, of gold with enamel and table-cut stones. The chain was made after the new statutes for the Order in 1693; the letter on the elephant’s cloth signifies Dacia (Denmark). Made in Copenhagen by the goldsmith Jean Henri de Moor? The elephant possibly made by Paul Kurtz, 1671.
5548. The Chain of the Order of Dannebrog with Insignia, of gold with enamel and table-cut stones. The Chain was made after the new statutes for the Order in 1693. The letter W stands for Valdemar II Sejr, who, legend has it, received the Dannebrog from heaven during the battle of Lyndanisse in 1219. C5 signifies Christian V, who re-established the Order in 1671. The Insignia was possibly made by Paul Kurtz, 1671.
5550. Star of the Order of the Elephant, to be worn on the doublet of the Anointing Dress. Brilliants on gold and enamel. Made for Christian VI by Frederik (I) Fabritius in 1731.
5552. The star of the Order of the Elephant, of brilliants and pearls on gold and enamel. Made c. 1770 by J.F. Fistaine?
5554. Star of the Order of Dannebrog, of gold with brilliants and rubies. Made after amendments to the statutes of the Order in 1808, probably for Frederik VI.
5556. Swordbelt belonging to the Anointing Dress. Gold embroidery made for the anointing of Christian VIII in 1840 by Eug. Beauvais in Paris. The jewels of gold with enamel and diamonds belonged originally to Christian V’s Swordbelt.
5558. Garters belonging to the Anointing Dress, made, like the Sword belt, in Paris in 1840. Buckles and jewels made by Frederik (I) Fabritius in 1731.
5560-5565
Collection of crown jewels for the use of the reigning Queen, founded by Queen Sophie Magdalene in her Will of 1746, and subsequently added to by gifts from later queens and princesses. At the last Absolutist anointing in 1840, Queen Caroline Amalie had the main part of the crown jewels re-made into four sets:
5560. Set of brilliants consisting of necklace with seven pendants, brooch in the form of a floral bouquet, and earrings. Made in 1840 by C.M. Weisshaupt. The largest pendant in the necklace belonged to Queen Sophie Magdalene, the six smaller ones to Queen Caroline Mathilde. The two drop-earrings belonged to Queen Juliane Marie.
5562. Costume brooches: 14 bouquets of rose-cut diamonds. Belonged to Princess Charlotte Amalie.
5564. Set of rose-cut diamonds with belt and brooch to divide into 4 smaller brooches, and two necklaces. Matching pointed diamond with clasp? Made in 1840 by C.M. Weisshaupt. The stones belonged to Christian VI’s sister, Princess Charlotte Amalie.
5566. Hair ornament in the form of a half-moon with brilliants and feathers of pearls. Made for Frederik VI’s consort Marie c. 1810, probably by Frederik (II) Fabritius or F.V. Henriques.
5592-5598
5592. The Crown of the Absolute Monarchs, used by the kings from Christian V to Christian VIII. Made by Paul Kurtz in Copenhagen 1670-71. Gold with enamel and table-cut stones. Total weight 2080 g. On the circlet 2 sapphires (144 and 81 carats / 28.8 and 16.2 g respectively) and 2 spinel rubies (107 and 90 carats / 21.4 and 18.0 g respectively); on the cross a red sapphire. The precious stones are presumably reused from older jewels. The “large rare sapphire” on the front of the crown dates back to Frederik I and was presumably a gift to his father, Christian I, from the Duke of Milan in 1474. On the palmette above this is a table-cut diamond, behind which Christian V’s monogram in gold thread can be seen. Since the abolition of Absolutism, the crown has only been used at the castrum doloris of the deceased Kings.
5594. The Queen’s Crown, made for Queen Sophie Magdalene by court jeweller Frederik (I) Fabritius in 1731. Used most recently in 1840. The table-cut stones are believed to have come from Queen Sophie Amalie’s crown from 1648.
5596. Christian V’s coronation in the chapel of Frederiksborg Palace in 1671. Sketch for an engraving, painted by Michael van Haven.
5598. Crowns and coronets of royalty and the peerage, arranged in order of precedence in 1671, during the Absolutist period.

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